Custom ExtJS Grid Flag Component

Last time I wrote about ExtJS I was highlighting how our ExtJS theme helped make our grids engaging, intuitive and useful. This time I’m going to pick out an element of that article and show you how you can create your own “flag column”. This is a little “flair” that sits top right of a column to denote some attribute you can chose. In the last article we were using it to show records that had been marked as “favourites” or been “flagged” for review:

 

Grid rows

 

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How Our ExtJS Theme Helps Make Our Grids Rock

Many people who see the platform I’m helping create at Engage Software have commented positively on how different it looks to all the other software they have to use in their daily jobs. I therefore thought it would be nice to occasionally highlight certain areas of the platform that are achieved using ExtJS to show off what can be done with the right mix of components and a killer theme. Our ExtJS theme was conceived way before Neptune ever existed and has continued to evolve and improve.

In this article we’re going to take a little look at grids. More specifically we’re looking just at the rows in those grids – as that’s where most of the action happens! For now we’ll take a very high level view and in future articles I’ll reveal a little about how you can get some similar results.

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Using ExtJS MVC Architecture Without Viewports

Why would you want to do this? Well, if you’re working on a project that’s not 100% ExtJS from top to bottom, it’s likely you’re using ExtJS along side other frameworks and cherry picking the best features as you need them. For example, at my current job, we use ExtJS for grids, forms, some data bound components we’ve built out ourselves and of course the accompanying stores that stick it all together but we don’t use ExtJS to provide a “single page app” in what may be considered the usual ExtJS MVC approach when using 4.x+.

So I decided to just give it a go and see what happened. After all, worse case scenario is I lose a little time working on a mini experiment that goes nowhere but teaches me at least something.

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